Login or Register

800.334.5551 Live Chat (offline)

Life Science

  • Fetal Pig Dissection Pigs are excellent and engaging specimens for studying mammalian anatomy. They exhibit hair, a muscular diaphragm, a 4-chambered heart, and mammary glands. View »
  • Introduction to Ascomycetes This lab introduces students to the variation found in the fungal phylum Ascomycota. Students examine four representatives: Anthracobia muelleri, Eurotium chevalieri, Schizosaccharomyces octosporus, and Sordaria fimicola. View »
  • Introduction to Lichens In this lab students observe basic lichen types (crustose, foliose, fruticose and fruticose pendant) and discover that lichens are composite organisms, consisting of fungal and algal components. View »
  • What Do Plants Need To Grow? Explore the phenomenon of plant growth with this guided inquiry activity. Students use seed disks to determine the amount of sunlight and water plants need to grow. For grades K-2. View »
  • Structure and Function in Plant and Animal Cell Osmosis Use this fun, interesting lab activity to show students how various structures within plant and animal cells are affected by osmosis. View »
  • Human Body: Muscular System Use this infographic to teach the structure and function of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. View »
  • Investigating Hatching of Brine Shrimp Eggs In this lab students study the hatching of brine shrimp eggs and design an experiment to see what factors influence hatching. View »
  • Meet the 12-Spotted Lady Beetle Explore the fascinating life cycle of the lady beetle with the help of this infographic. View »
  • From Euglena to Zebra Fish: An Overview of the Diversity of Eyes Did you know scientists study zebrafish to gain further understanding of diseases of the human eye? Why is this? What is the connection between zebrafish and human vision? View »
  • Daphnia Heart Rate In this introductory physiology lab, students determine the heart rate of Daphnia magna and then test the effect of changing temperature on the heart rate. View »
  • Optics of the Human Eye A cross-curricular lesson in biology and physics allows students to make a simple model of the human eye. Students investigate how geometric optics can be applied to this complex, biological structure in order to describe how the images we see are formed when special tissues in our eye, the cornea and the lens, refract the light entering the pupil to create an image on the back wall of the eyeball (the retina), like a miniature, organic movie projector. View »
  • Seed Germination In this inquiry activity students in grades 5-10 design and conduct an experiment to investigate factors that may affect seed germination. View »
  •